Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Selena Gomez Covers Teen Vogue September

Selena Gomez, 20, will be on the September cover of Teen Vogue. Let's see what Selena had to say to Teen Vogue.

One direction: up close with Selena Gomez. Selena Gomez is a mini mogul with an acting and singing career, a perfume and fashion line, and a supernova boyfriend. So what more could Selena Gomez want? As it turns out, a lot.

On moving away from teen roles: "Monte Carlo was a good step for me at the time, but I would never want to do something like that again."

On her acting goals: "Being part of the Disney Channel was such a blessing, and I'm super happy with what my show accomplished, but acting is something I would like to take on more seriously. I don't necessarily feel accomplished. I want to create a whole different persona when it comes to acting."

On her next album: "It's going to be different—a little older but still really fun."

On her dream music collaboration: "Who I would die to work with, but I don't think he ever would—I don't even think he's doing music anymore — is Justin Timberlake. Just 'cause I love his music sooo much."

On her personal style: "I've never been comfortable with saying, 'Here's a top that I'm going to sell for $350, and it's just a T-shirt.' I get sent things that are really nice, and I'm like, 'This is cute,' and I look at the tag and it's $200. I'm like, Oh my gosh, people probably think I buy it, and I don't. It's really weird."

On her relationship: "It's really fun. I'm lucky. I'm 20. I don't take anything in my personal life too seriously. I have great friends and a solid group of people I love. I feel like everything else will come organically."

Photographs in this article are courtesy of Teen Vogue. We hope you will pick up the September edition of Teen Vogue with Selena Gomez on the cover.

Women win team gold at 2012 Olympic Games

London, England - The United States women's team won gold with a score of 183.596 at the 2012 Olympic Games at the North Greenwich Arena. Russia earned silver with a 178.530 and Romania took bronze with a 176.414. China placed fourth with a 174.430.

This is the second women's team gold in U.S. history, the first coming in 1996. The gold-medal finish is the sixth consecutive team medal for the U.S. women. Dating back to 1992, it is the second-longest active women's Olympic team medal streak behind Romania (1976-2012).

The U.S. Women's Team features: Gabby Douglas of Virginia Beach, Va./Chow's Gymnastics and Dance Institute; McKayla Maroney of Long Beach, Calif./All Olympia Gymnastics Center; Aly Raisman of Needham, Mass./Brestyan's American Gymnastics; Kyla Ross of Aliso Viejo, Calif./Gym-Max Gymnastics; and Jordyn Wieber of DeWitt, Mich./Gedderts' Twistars USA.

The USA had the highest team score on vault (48.132), balance beam (45.299) and floor exercise (45.366). The U.S. placed third on uneven bars (44.799) behind China (46.399) and Russia (46.166).

Women's National Team Coordinator Martha Karolyi said, "We are certainly enjoying this moment. This is the result of the teamwork and what we did through the years. All the hard work paid off in the end."

The USA women started off strong on vault. Wieber, Douglas and Maroney all competed a Yurchenko two-and-a-half, also known as an Amanar. Wieber scored a 15.933, Douglas scored a 15.966 and Maroney stuck her vault and received the highest U.S. vault score with a 16.233. The USA scored 48.132 on vault and was 1.733 points ahead of China, who started on bars. Russia, who started on vault, was third.

Wieber once again led off for the USA on uneven bars, scoring a 14.666 for her solid routine complete with a full twisting double layout dismount. Ross showed precise lines, high release moves and stuck her double layout dismount to earn a 14.933. Douglas anchored the team for the U.S. and scored an impressive 15.200 for her sky-high release moves and double layout dismount. USA continued the lead with a 92.931 to Russia's 92.532.

On beam, Ross got the U.S. off to a good start with her routine, scoring a 15.133. Ross competed a front aerial to flip flop, layout stepout and dismounted with a double tuck. Douglas' routine, complete with her standing full and flip flop series to double pike, scored a 15.233. Raisman's routine included a solid flip flop layout series and she dismounted with her double Arabian dismount to score a 14.933. The USA team score after three events 138.230 to Russia's 136.931.

Douglas showed off on floor exercise with her dazzling smile and impressive tumbling and dance to score a 15.066. She mounted with a one-and-a-half to triple full and and dismounted with a double tuck to jump. Wieber hit the routine of her life complete with a double twisting double back and a one-and-a-half to triple full to score a 15.000. Raisman, who medaled on floor at the 2011 World Championships, showed impressive tumbling complete with a one-and-a-half to double Arabian and second pass of a pike double Arabian to jump to clinch the medal for the U.S. with her score of 15.300.

Quotes from the team:

Douglas on the importance of a strong start on vault: "We were all spot on. We stuck three 2.5 (Amanar vaults) and its contagious. I'm so proud of these girls. We did awesome. A lot of hard work and sacrifice in the gym, and it all pays off."

Maroney on her role after competing on vault, her only event of the night: "I just wanted them to do so well and I'm just so proud of them. I was screaming and yelling. That last event on floor was really exhilarating, but amazing at the same time. I don't think I will ever, ever forget that."

Raisman on having to wait until the third event to compete: "I just kept moving and cheering on the Team USA girls. When the Russians were going, I didn't pay attention to them. It wasn't that bad. It went by pretty quick."

Ross on the U.S. accomplishing its goal of a team gold: "We all did our events the best that we could and hit our routines, and we are all really proud of each other. It was really fun watching floor. McKayla and I were together cheering as loud as we could. We were screaming so loud."

Wieber on working as a team: "This couldn't be possible without everyone stepping up today. Everyone did their job and was completely amazing. I am so excited."

Raisman and Douglas compete in the all-around finals Aug. 2, and individual event finals are Aug. 5-7. Team USA individual event finalists are: Maroney, vault; Douglas, bars; Douglas and Raisman, beam; and Wieber and Raisman on floor. Danell Leyva and John Orozco compete in the men's all-around final Aug. 1, and event finalists are: Jake Dalton, floor exercise; Sam Mikulak, vault; Jonathan Horton, horizontal bar; and Leyva, horizontal bar. Individual event finals are Aug. 5-7.

Ways to follow the Olympic Games include:

USAGym.org, the USA Gymnastics official website, is a great source for information about the sport: latest news, the schedule of its premier events, athlete biographies, videos, photo galleries, live scoring from major events and more. USA Gymnastics also has usagymclub.org, which is a resource center for parents of potential and existing gymnasts.

TeamUSA.org, the U.S. Olympic Committee's website will also be a good resource for information on the Team USA in London.

Facebook - USA Gymnastics has an official Facebook page, www.facebook.com/USAGymnastics, which carries USA Gymnastics information and activities for fans. The USOC's official Facebook page is www.facebook.com/USOlympicTeam

Twitter - USA Gymnastics has an official Twitter feed -- @usagym. The USOC's Twitter feed is @usolympic.

NBCOlympics.com - NBC is the broadcast and web source for coverage and news on the Olympic Games. NBCOlympics.com will carry live coverage of every gymnastics session as well as all sports, and maintain an archive for on-demand coverage. A special "Live Extra" app for smartphones and tablets is available as well.

For gymnastics, viewing options will include a single "integrated" feed showing various competitors (akin to watching on TV), plus separate feeds for each apparatus.

Check your local listings for dates and times in your area here: http://www.nbcolympics.com/tv-listings/index.html.

YouTube - USA Gymnastics has an official YouTube Channel, www.youtube.com/usagymnasticsorg, which features routines of the top gymnasts from various events, interviews, etc. The USOC's YouTube Channel is www.youtube.com/TeamUSA.

SPECIAL EXHIBIT OF JAKE DAY PRINTS


Dozens of prints of Maurice “Jake” Day’s imaginative artwork, including this one called “Mountain Climbing Bears,” are on display at Pemaquid Watershed Association through August 17.

HURRY IN TO VIEW SPECIAL EXHIBIT OF JAKE DAY PRINTS AT PWA

Damariscotta, ME − July 30, 2012 − Damariscotta-born Maurice “Jake” Day, famous in part for his illustrations for Walt Disney’s Bambi, used to tell his children and grandchildren "To walk slowly, stop often, and look." Now, to encourage the public to do just that, an exhibit of some of his famous and lesser known works is on display through August 17 at Pemaquid Watershed Association’s (PWA) office suite in downtown Damariscotta.
Maurice “Jake” Day was born in Damariscotta in 1892 and became an internationally renowned artist, sculptor, photographer, and naturalist. In particular, he is noted as “Maine’s Bambi Connection” for his illustration work for Walt Disney. Maurice’s grandson, Daniel Day, along with Daniel’s wife Sandi, have a pondside home within the Pemaquid River watershed and offered PWA the opportunity to present a special print collection of their grandfather’s artwork as a fundraiser in support of the PWA mission. “Pap,” as they lovingly refer to him, created witty imaginative art depicting a menagerie of mischievous wild critters – from chipmunks to gentle bears -- joyously cavorting deep in the forest. He painted wilderness, majestic meadow to mountain, and coastal scenes to delight. PWA is pleased to collaborate with Daniel and Sandi Day to share Jake Day’s art with the hope that people feel his spirit and the reverence he had for the Maine animals and scenes he so loved.
The exhibit may be viewed weekdays from 9:30 to 4:30 p.m. by visiting PWA, located above Salt Bay Café and the Damariscotta Region Chamber of Commerce. For more information and a map to PWA, visit www.pemaquidwatershed.org. The Day family is donating 35% of proceeds from sales to support PWA’s mission of conserving the natural resources of the Pemaquid Peninsula through land and water stewardship and education.

ROWING: A Moment to Celebrate in the Face of a Life Struggle

Ed Moran


LONDON – Margot Shumway had a lot to celebrate today.

Not the least of which was advancing to the final in the women’s double sculls at the 2012 Olympic Games with her teammate Sarah Trowbridge (Guilford, Conn.), or the birthday she has coming up in two days.

One of the biggest reasons Shumway, 32, of Westlake, Ohio, had to be thankful for, was that her mother, Julia, was here to see her achieve a dream. Julia Shumway, 63, was diagnosed with lung cancer two years ago, and is in the middle of a second-round of chemotherapy.

And so, only minutes after climbing out of their boat, both Shumway and Trowbridge walked immediately to the friends and family section and gave Margot’s mother a long three-way hug.

“It is hard and it isn’t,” Shumway said later, while glancing back at her mother who was wearing a pink scarf and sitting in a wheel chair surrounded by family.

“It was definitely harder when she was first diagnosed, because it was just such an unknown,” she said. “But it’s been two years now, she was off chemo for a full year, but she’s back on it now to she if she can keep everything at bay for a little longer.

“Just look at her. She’s in London in the middle of chemo and just fighting through it, so I’m proud of her, and it’s tough, but my whole family is here and nothing could be better than that,” she said.

“Instead of focusing on worrying, I focus on celebrating the moment and what we have and that’s something I definitely take from my mom, because she is just so thankful that she is here and healthy and with all of her children and her husband and celebrating this awesome experience.”

Perennial Gardening Class Continues at Merryspring‏

Camden/Rockport, Maine - Camden gardener and Merryspring volunteer Wendy Andresen will present the third installment of her monthly lecture series entitled “Tending the Perennial Garden” at Merryspring Nature Center on Tuesday, August 7 at 12:00 noon.

The third session in her continuing series, Wendy will provide helpful tips and demonstrate practices to encourage your perennial garden to flourish this summer. At the start of a new month, every class is different. As the seasons progress, the series adapts to accommodate the changes in the perennial garden. Andresen’s presentation will reference Tracy DiSabato-Aust’s essential garden manual The Well Tended Perennial Garden. Copies of that book and other garden tools and accessories will be available for purchase.

Participants for this talk should meet outside at Merryspring’s gazebo at noon. Guests are reminded to wear comfortable shoes and weather-appropriate clothing to this event.

This presentation is part of the Summer Talk Series, cosponsored by Camden National Bank and Jaret & Cohn Real Estate.

Admission to the Tuesday Talks is free to Merryspring members and children, with a nominal $5 fee for non-members.

Merryspring is a member-supported, non-profit nature education center and park located at the end of Conway Road just off Rt. 1 by the Hannaford shopping plaza in Camden. For more information, call Merryspring at 236-2239

Central Maine Medical Center receives Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Bronze Quality Achievement Award

Lewiston, Maine - Central Maine Medical Center (CMMC) has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®–Stroke Bronze Quality Achievement Award. The award recognizes CMMC’s commitment and success in implementing a higher standard of stroke care by ensuring that stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted standards and recommendations.
     
“With a stroke, time lost is brain lost, and the Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Bronze Quality Achievement Award addresses the important element of time,” said Daniel Bobker, M.D., CMMC’s Inpatient Neurologist.  Central Maine Medical Center has developed a comprehensive system for rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients admitted to the emergency department. This includes always being equipped to provide brain imaging scans, having neurologists available to conduct patient evaluations and using clot-busting medications when appropriate.

To receive the Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Bronze Quality Achievement Award, CMMC consistently followed the treatment guidelines in the Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program for 90 days. These include aggressive use of medications like tPA, antithrombotics, anticoagulation therapy, DVT prophylaxis, cholesterol reducing drugs, and smoking cessation. The 90-day evaluation period is the first in an ongoing self-evaluation by the hospital to continually reach the 85 percent compliance level needed to sustain this award.

“We commend Central Maine Medical Center for its success in implementing standards of care andprotocols,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., chair of the national Get With the Guidelines Steering Committee and director of the TeleStroke and Acute Stroke Services at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.. “The full implementation of acute care and secondary prevention recommendations and guidelines is a critical step in saving the lives and improving outcomes of stroke patients.”

Get With The Guidelines–Stroke uses the “teachable moment,” the time soon after a patient has had a stroke, when they are most likely to listen to and follow their healthcare professionals’ guidance. Studies demonstrate that patients who are taught how to manage their risk factors while still in thehospital reduce their risk of a second stroke. Through Get With The Guidelines–Stroke, customized patient education materials are made available at the point of discharge, based on patients’ individual risk profiles. The take-away materials are written in an easy-to-understand format and are available in English and Spanish. In addition, the Get With The Guidelines Patient Management Tool provides access to up-to-date cardiovascular and stroke science at the point of care.

“The time is right for Central Maine Medical Center to be focused on improving the quality of stroke care by implementing Get With The Guidelines–Stroke. The number of acute ischemic stroke patients eligible for treatment is expected to grow over the next decade due to increasing stroke incidence and a largeaging population,” said Dr. Bobker.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is one of the leading causes of death and serious, long-term disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

Find Your Way in the Forest

Camden/Rockport, Maine - Families and children are invited to Merryspring Nature Center to participate in a free orienteering and outdoor navigation workshop on Sunday, August 5 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm.

The third in a series of free summer workshops, Orienteering and Outdoor Navigation Day will instruct children and families about basic backcountry voyaging skills. Guests of all ages are invited to take part in a host of activities, including determining height of trees with only a pencil, finding north using a wrist watch, and of course to take their first steps into orienteering. A compass course will be erected for those who wish to test their new skills traversing the Merryspring grounds.

Orienteering and Outdoor Navigation Day will start outside at the Hexagon gazebo. Interested participants are encouraged to bring an orienteering compass if already owned, but not necessary. A limited number of compasses will be available for use.

The Free Family Workshop series offers a wide array of educational events from 1:00 to 3:00 PM on select Sundays throughout the summer. These workshops are open free of charge to members and non-members alike. For more information on this event or any upcoming events, please contact Merryspring at 236-2239 or info@merryspring.org.

Merryspring is a member-supported, non-profit nature education center and park located at the end of Conway Road just off Rt. 1 by the Hannaford shopping plaza in Camden.

TUESDAY LONDON OLYMPIC COMPETITION SCHEDULE


COMPETITION SCHEDULE
SHOOTING M Skeet (Qualification) Royal Artillery Barracks 9a
Frank Thompson, Vincent Hancock
ARCHERY M Individual (1/32 Eliminations) Lord’s Cricket Ground 9:13a
Jacob Wukie vs. Jayanta Talukdar (IND)
ROWING W Double Sculls (Repechages) Eton Dorney 9:50a
Margot Shumway, Sarah Trowbridge
ARCHERY M Individual (1/16 Eliminations) Lord’s Cricket Ground 9:52a
SWIMMING M 100m Freestyle (Heats) Aquatics Centre 10a
Nathan Adrian, Cullen Jones
ROWING W Lightweight Double Sculls (Repechages) Eton Dorney 10:10a
Kristin Hedstrom, Julie Nichols
JUDO M -81kg (Round of 32) ExCel N2 10:19a
Travis Stevens vs. Aljaz Sedej (SLO)
SWIMMING W 200m Butterfly (Heats) Aquatics Centre 10:23a
Cammile Adams, Kathleen Hersey
EQUESTRIAN - EVENTING Mixed Individual Jumping (Qualifier), Team Jumping (Finals) Greenwich Park 10:30a
Tiana Coudray, Karen O’Connor, Will Coleman, Phillip Dutton, Boyd Martin
SWIMMING M 200m Breaststroke (Heats) Aquatics Centre 10:40a
Scott Weltz, Clark Burckle
ARCHERY W Individual (1/32 Eliminations) Lord’s Cricket Ground 10:44a
Jennifer Nichols vs. Chekrovolu Swuro (IND)
SWIMMING M 4x200m Freestyle (Heats) Aquatics Centre 11:02a
ROWING M Single Sculls (Quarterfinals) Eton Dorney 11:20a
Ken Jurkowski
JUDO M -81kg (Round of 16) ExCel N2 11:29a
TENNIS M Doubles (2nd Round) Wimbledon 11:30a
Bob Bryan/Mike Bryan vs. RUS Court 18 (4th Match)
W Doubles (2nd Round) Wimbledon 11:30a
Lizel Huber/Lisa Raymond vs. POL Court 14 (3rd Match)
Singles (2nd Round) Wimbledon 11:30a
Varvara Lepchenko vs. Julia Goerges (GER) Court 12 (2nd Match)
FENCING M Individual Foil (Round of 32) ExCeL S1 11:50a
Miles Chamley-Watson vs. Alaaeldin Abouelkassem (EGY)
ROWING W Single Sculls (Quarterfinals) Eton Dorney 11:50a
Gevvie Stone
SAILING W Radial (Race 3) Weymouth – Nothe 12p
Paige Railey
M 49er (Race 3) Weymouth – Harbour 12p
Trevor Moore, Erik Storck
R:SX (Race 1) Weymouth – Bay West 12p
Bob Willis
Finn (Race 5) Weymouth – Bay South 12p
Zach Railey
TENNIS W Singles (2nd Round) Wimbledon 12p
Venus Williams vs. Aleksandra Wozniak (CAN) Centre Court
M Singles (2nd Round) Wimbledon 12p
Andy Roddick vs. Novak Djokovic (SRB) Centre Court (3rd Match)
W Doubles (2nd Round) Wimbledon 12p
Serena Williams/Venus Williams vs. GER Court 2 (3rd Match)
SAILING M Star (Race 5) Weymouth – Bay South 12:05p
Brian Fatih, Mark Mendelblatt

JUDO M -81kg (Quarterfinals) ExCel N2 12:11p
FENCING M Individual Foil (Round of 32) ExCeL S1 12:20p
Alexander Massialas vs. Etienne Lalonde Turbide (CAN)
ROWING M Lightweight Fours (Semifinals) Eton Dorney 12:40p
Anthony Fahden, William Newell, Nicholas la Cava, Robin Prendes
FENCING M Individual Foil (Round of 32) ExCeL S1 1:20p
Race Imboden vs. TBD
BOXING M Light Welterweight (Round of 32) ExCeL South Arena 2 1:30p
Jamel Herring vs. Daniyar Yeleussinov (KAZ)
SAILING W Elliott 6m – USA vs. FIN Weymouth – Nothe 1:35p
Debbie Capozzi, Anna Tunnicliffe, Molly Vandemoer
SHOOTING M Skeet (Finals) Royal Artillery Barracks 2p
SAILING M Laser (Race 3) Weymouth – Harbour 2p
Rob Crane
W RS:X (Race 1) Weymouth – Bay West 2p
Farrah Hall
Radial (Race 4) Weymouth – Harbour 2:05p
Paige Railey
FENCING M Individual Foil (Round of 16) ExCeL S1 2:10p
EQUESTRIAN - EVENTING Mixed Individual Jumping (Finals) Greenwich Park 2:30p
JUDO M -81kg (Semifinals) ExCel N2 2:42p
FENCING M Individual Foil (Quarterfinals) ExCeL S1 3:30p
SAILING W Elliott 6m – USA vs. FRA Weymouth – Nothe 3:30p
Debbie Capozzi, Anna Tunnicliffe, Molly Vandemoer
JUDO M -81kg (Gold-Medal Match) ExCel N2 4:10p
GYMNASTICS - ARTISTIC W Team (Finals) North Greenwich Arena 4:30p
Gabrielle Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Alexandra Raisman, Kyla Ross, Jordyn Wieber
VOLLEYBALL M USA vs. GER (Preliminary Play, Pool B) Earls Court 4:45p
SOCCER W USA vs. PRK (First Round, Group G) Old Trafford 5:15p
FENCING M Individual Foil (Semifinals) ExCeL S1 6 p
FIELD HOCKEY W USA vs. ARG (Preliminary Round, Group B) Riverbank Arena 7p
FENCING M Individual Foil (Finals) ExCeL S1 7:10p
SWIMMING M 100m Freestyle (Semifinals) Aquatics Centre 7:30p
WATER POLO M USA vs. ROU (Preliminary Round, Group B) Water Polo Arena 7:40p
SWIMMING W 200m Freestyle (Finals) Aquatics Centre 7:41p
Missy Franklin, Allison Schmitt
M 200m Butterfly (Finals) Aquatics Centre 7:49p
Tyler Clary, Michael Phelps
W 100m Butterfly (Semifinals) Aquatics Centre 7:57p
M 200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) Aquatics Centre 8:20p
W 200m Individual Medley (Finals) Aquatics Centre 8:43p
Caitlin Leverenz, Ariana Kukors
M 4x200m Freestyle (Finals) Aquatics Centre 8:51p
VOLLEYBALL - BEACH M USA vs. ESP (Preliminary Play, Pool B) Horse Guards Parade 9p
Todd Rogers, Phil Dalhausser
BASKETBALL M USA vs. TUN (Preliminary Round, Group A) Basketball Arena 10:15p
VOLLEYBALL - BEACH W USA vs. NED (Preliminary Play, Pool D) Horse Guards Parade 11p
Jen Kessy, April Ross

Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands: Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park Offers Free, Daily Nature Programs

Augusta, Maine - Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park in Freeport is offering nature programs daily at 2 p.m. through Labor Day.

The programs, which include walks, talks and activities in the beautiful, natural setting of the park, are free with park admission. No reservations are needed, except for large groups. Programs last about one hour, weather permitting, and are suitable for children and adults.

Most programs start at the circle of benches at the end of the park’s second parking lot, unless otherwise noted.

For more information or to arrange for group visits, visitors can call 865-4465 or go to: http://www.maine.gov/wolfesneckwoods

For more information about Maine state parks and historic sites, go to: http://www.parksandlands.com

Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park Nature Programs for August

Wednesday, Aug. 1, The Edge of the Sea - Enjoy a walk, short talks, and activities on the natural history and ecology of our varied shore. 2 p.m., Wheelchair accessible. One hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Thursday, Aug. 2, Wild Relatives – Everyone has them!  Get acquainted with the wild relatives of things in and around your home on this tour. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot. 1 hour program, weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Friday, Aug. 3, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Saturday, Aug. 4, In the Pines - Tour the pine forest on our accessible path and see why Maine is the Pine Tree State. 2 p.m., one-hour program, weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465.

Sunday, Aug. 5, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Monday, Aug. 6, Tree Hunt – Stop by the benches to get your papers for this fun, self-guiding hunt, and then come back afterwards to see how well you did. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Tuesday, Aug. 7, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Wednesday, Aug. 8, The Shore Tour - Learn about our varied shores through talks, activities, and views along the accessible path. Wheelchair accessible. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Thursday, Aug. 9, Small Wonders – Discover the extraordinary things that are right before your eyes.  (Hand lenses provided.) 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Friday, Aug. 10, Hike with the Ranger – Enjoy the best that the park has to offer in this season with a knowledgeable guide. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Saturday, Aug. 11, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Sunday, Aug. 12, Steamer Dig – Learn about the life and times of the soft-shell clam. Then try your hand at digging this delicacy of the deep mud with an experienced guide. (Bring mud sneakers or high boots, gloves, and clam hoe or spading fork.) 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Monday, Aug. 13, Casco Bay Walk – Enjoy views of rocky shores, nesting ospreys, and islands in the bay on this one-mile hike. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot. one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Tuesday, Aug. 14, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Wednesday, Aug. 15, Stroll with the Ranger – Take a relaxed tour with the ranger on our wheelchair-accessible path. 2 p.m. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Thursday, Aug. 16, Drawing From Nature – Use drawing and art as a way to get up close and personal with the wildlife in the park. Drawing materials will be provided, visitors are invited to bring their own if they prefer. 2 p.m., meet at the benches by the second parking lot. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Friday, Aug. 17, Stories in Stone – Get to know the story of Maine’s rockbound coast on this walk with talks and activities. 2 p.m., meet at the circle of benches by the second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465.

Saturday, Aug. 18, Wild Relatives –  Everyone has them!  Get acquainted with the wild relatives of things in and around your home on this tour. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot. one hour program, weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Sunday, Aug. 19, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Monday, Aug. 20, Tree Hunt – Stop by the benches to get your papers for this fun, self-guiding hunt, and then come back afterwards to see how well you did. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Tuesday, Aug. 21, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Wednesday, Aug. 22, Hike with the Ranger – Enjoy the best that the park has to offer in this season with a knowledgeable guide. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Thursday, Aug. 23, Who Lived Here Before Us? – Learn about the history of a very special part of the Maine coast, and discover where we can still see signs of the past today. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Friday, Aug. 24, Small Wonders – Discover the extraordinary things that are right before your eyes.  (Hand lenses provided.) 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Saturday, Aug. 25, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Sunday, Aug. 26, Tide Pools - Visit this informal program on the rocky shore near Googins Island to discover the secrets of a tide pool. Stop by the shore anytime from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465.

Monday, Aug. 27, Secrets of the Shore – Discover the secrets of life in the salt marsh, mud flat, and rocky shore in this one hour tour. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot. one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Tuesday, Aug. 28, Osprey Watch - Stop by the osprey sign opposite Googins Island to get a close look at the nesting ospreys any time from 2-3 p.m., weather permitting. Wheelchair accessible. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Wednesday, Aug. 29, Casco Bay Walk - Enjoy views of rocky shores, nesting ospreys, and islands in the bay on this one-mile hike. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot. one hour program, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Thursday, Aug. 30, Forest and Shore Tour – Get to know the things that live in the park's forest and on its shores on this eye-opening tour. 2 p.m., meet at circle of benches by second parking lot, one hour, weather permitting. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

Friday, Aug. 31, Drawing From Nature - Use drawing and art as a way to get up close and personal with the wildlife in the park. Drawing materials will be provided, visitors are invited to bring their own if they prefer. 2 p.m., meet at the benches by the second parking lot. Free with park admission. Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park, Freeport. 865-4465

VIEW THE PERSEIDS METEOR SHOWER FROM BEECH HILL

Rockport, Maine - Coastal Mountains Land Trust invites the stargazers of all ages to view the Perseids meteor shower from its Beech Hill Preserve on Saturday, August 11 from 8:30 to 10:00pm. Though the early morning hours may be best for sighting the most meteors, the sky just after dusk promises the more impressive spectacle of long streaking meteors.

Tom Hoffelder, a retired aeronautical engineer and avid amateur astronomer for 38 years, will be on hand to educate visitors about the Perseids and share deep star clusters with his large telescope. Bring your lawn chair or blanket to lay back and watch the show, as well as a flashlight to help navigate the ¾ mile walk up and down the hill. Viewing will take place next to Beech Nut, the historic stone hut at the preserve’s summit, and the Land Trust asks that visitors park in the Beech Hill Road parking lot.

Coastal Mountains Land Trust has been working for more than 25 years to permanently conserve land to benefit the natural and human communities of western Penobscot Bay. For more information, or directions to the Beech Hill Preserve, please call (207) 236-7091 or visit www.coastalmountains.org.

LONDON 2012 RESULTS: MONDAY



LONDON 2012 RESULTS: MONDAY

BADMINTON
Howard Bach and Tony Gunawan lost their third and final match of
pool play to Japan’s Naoki Kawamae and Shoji Sato, 0-2 (15-21 and
15-21), on Monday (July 30) at Wembley Arena. With an 0-3 record,
the pair did not advance past pool play.


BASKETBALL (WOMEN)
Candace Parker scored 14 points to lead a balanced attack as the
U.S. women’s basketball team recorded a 90-38 win over Angola
Monday night in Group A play at the Basketball Arena. The U.S.
improved to 2-0 in preliminary round action and will face Turkey (2-0)
on Wednesday (Aug. 1). Angola led at the outset, but the Americans
rode a 16-3 run to close out the first quarter, giving them a 22-12 lead
that they built in the second stanza, going into the locker room with
a 41-18 halftime margin. Seimone Augustus added 13 and led the
Americans with three rebounds.


BOXING
Team USA suffered its first loss of the Games on Monday (July 30) as
light heavyweight Marcus Browne fell to Damien Hooper of Australia
in the opening round. The bout was closely contested throughout, but
Hooper pulled out the win with a third-round surge, claiming a 13-11
victory. The U.S. takes the ring again this afternoon at ExCeL Arena,
as Jamel Herring opens the light welterweight division against Daniyar
Yeleussinov of Kazakhstan.


CANOE/KAYAK - SLALOM
Team USA’s two remaining boats in the slalom competition did not
advance to the semifinal round on Monday (July 30) at the Lee Valley
White Water Center. The men’s doubles canoe of Eric Hurd and Jeff
Larimer improved on their second run of the day to post a 109.78,
but fell shy of the top-10 semifinal cut by 2.31 seconds. In women’s
kayak, Caroline Queen’s opened with her best run of the day at
117.05 seconds, but it wasn’t enough to place in the top 15, which
was required to advance.


EQUESTRIAN - EVENTING
After Monday’s (July 30) cross-country competition at Greenwich
Park, the equestrian eventing team moved up to fifth place in the
standings with a total of 155.20 penalties. Leading the U.S. individually
is two-time Olympic gold medalist Phillip Dutton in 12th place with
47.1 penalties. Karen O’Connor and Boyd Martin sit at 24th (53.80)
and 26th (54.30). First-time Olympians Tiana Coudray and Will Coleman
each took jumping penalties on the day, which placed Coudray
42nd and Coleman 46th. The eventing competition concludes today
(July 31) with jumping.


FENCING
Team USA’s Maya Lawrence placed 16th in the women’s individual
epee competition after dropping a 15-7 decision to Italy’s Rossella
Fiamingo in the round of 16 at the ExCel Arena on Monday (July 30).
She advanced to the round of 16 with a 15-12 victory over Mara
Navarria of Italy earlier in the day. The other two remaining U.S. epee
fencers fell in the round of 64, as Susie Scanlan lost to the Ukraine’s
Olena Krybytska (15-13) and Courtney Hurley was eliminated by
France’s Laura Flessel-Colovic (15-12). The three fencers will now
turn their attention to the team event, where they will face Italy in the
opening round on Aug. 4.


GYMNASTICS - ARTISTIC
The U.S. men’s team finished fifth with an overall score of 269.952
on Monday evening (July 30) at North Greenwich Arena. The U.S.
was just over six points behind the gold-medal winners from China
(275.997), while Japan (271.952) and Great Britain (271.711) rounded
out the top three. The fortune of the U.S. team – comprised of Jacob
Dalton, Jonathan Horton, Danell Leyva, Sam Mikulak and John Orozco
– was affected by the pommel horse, where Team USA finished seventh 
among the eight teams, and the vault, where the Americans
posted the sixth-highest score. It marks the first time since the 2000
Olympic Games that the U.S. men did not medal in the team event.


ROWING
Despite rough waters and strong winds, three U.S. boats advanced
Monday (July 30) to the next round at Eton Dorney. The men’s four of
Charles Cole, Scott Gault,Glenn Ochal and Henrick Rummel won its
opening heat with a time of 5:54.88 to move on to the semifinals. The
men’s pair of Thomas Peszek and Silas Stafford placed third in the
repechage with a time of 6:27.41, to advance. The men’s quadruple
sculls - featuring Peter Graves, Elliot Hovey, Alex Osborne and Wes
Piermarini - just missed the semifinals cut with a fourth-place finish in
the repechage. In women’s double sculls, Team USA’s Margot Shumway
and Sarah Trowbridge finished third in their heat and progressed
to the repechage, scheduled for today. The U.S. finished second in
the repechage in the women’s quadruple sculls and advanced to the
final. Natalie Dell, Kara Kohler, Megan Kalmoe and Adrienne Martelli
will continue racing on Wednesday.


SAILING
Racing continued in the Starr, Finn and women’s match racing on
Monday (July 30), while opening in the Laser and Radial classes. After
four races, Zach Railey rates 13th against the field in Finn, while the
Star team of Mark Mendelblatt and Brian Fatih sit comfortably in sixth
place. The 49er duo of Erik Storck and Trevor Moore are seventh
after two races. Laser Radial sailor Paige Railey completed day one
in fifth place and Rob Crane currently sits in the 39th position in Laser
competition. Anna Tunnicliffe, Molly O’Bryan Vandemoer and Debbie
Capozzi improved their match racing record to 2-2. Racing continues
in all events today, along with the start of the men’s and women’s
windsurfing series.


SHOOTING
Vincent Hancock led the U.S. men’s skeet field with 74 targets Monday
(July 30) at Royal Artillary Barracks. He is poised to make history
as the first-ever skeet athlete to win back-to-back Olympic gold medals.
Meanwhile, Frank Thompson hit 71 targets to land in a six-way
tie for third. Jonathan Hall finished 27th in men’s 10-meter air rifle with
592 targets to complete his Olympic showing. Matt Emmons was
35th with 590 points and will shoot men’s 50-meter rifle 3-position on
Aug. 6.


TENNIS
Andy Roddick beat Slovakia’s Martin Klizan (7-5, 6-4) in the first round
of men’s singles, while John Isner topped Malek Jaziri of Tunisia (7-6,
6-2) in second-round action on Monday (July 30) at Wimbledon. In
women’s singles, Varvara Lepchenko needed three sets to put away
Paraguay’s Veronica Cepede Royg (7-5, 6-7, 6-2), while Venus Williams
defeated Italy’s Sara Errani (3-6, 1-6). In the second round of
women’s singles competition, Serena Williams secured a 6-2, 6-3
victory against Poland’s Urszula Radwanska. In doubles play, Venus
and Serena Williams combined for a 3-6, 2-6 victory over Romania’s
Sorana Cirstea and Simona Halep. The men’s and women’s singles
tournaments, as well as women’s doubles play continues today.


VOLLEYBALL - BEACH
Two-time defending gold medalists and third-seeded Misty May-
Treanor and Kerri Walsh defeated No. 10 Marketa Slukova and
Kristyna Kolocova of Czech Republic, 21-14, 21-19, on Monday night
(July 30) at Horse Guards Parage. The pair improved to 2-0 and will
complete Pool B play on Wednesday against Austria’s No. 15 Doris
and Stefanie Schwaiger. On the men’s side, Jake Gibb and Sean
Rosenthal lost to the Polish tandem of Mariusz Prudel and Grzegorz
Fijalek (21-17, 21-18). The loss dropped Gibb and Rosenthal to 1-1
in preliminary-round play. The duo will return to action on Wednesday
against Aleksandrs Samiolovs and Ruslans Sorokins of Latvia.


VOLLEYBALL - INDOOR (WOMEN)
IIn a rematch of the 2008 Olympic Games gold-medal match, the
U.S. knocked off Brazil, 3-1, on Monday (July 30). Destinee Hooker
led the team with 23 points with 22 spikes and one block. The U.S.
women only dropped the third set (22-25), while winning the first,
second and fourth to clinch the victory (25-18, 25-17, 25-21). The
team improved to 2-0 with six points in Pool B play, and takes on
third-seeded China (2-0) at Earls Court on Wednesday.


WATER POLO (WOMEN)
Maggie Steffens tied an Olympic record with seven goals as the U.S.
defeated Hungary, 14-13, to open play at the Games on Monday
(July 30). Courtney Mathewson contributed four goals, while Brenda
Villa, Kelly Rulon and Kami Craig supported the scoring effort with
one goal apiece. Betsey Armstrong stopped six shots in the victory.
Team USA never trailed in the high-scoring contest, but the match
was tied on three occasions. Up next, the U.S. will meet Spain in
Group A play today at 6:20 p.m. BST.
















FIELD HOCKEY: REINPRECHTS, SHARING THE JOURNEY


REINPRECHTS: SHARING THE JOURNEY
BY VIRGINIA HARRISON
For sisters Katie and Julia Reinprecht, their first Olympic experience
has been a little extra sweet. From grabbing pictures of the sights of
London to facing the world’s best on the field, the quest for a medal is
simply more enjoyable when shared with a best friend.
“This whole journey to the Olympic Games has been really incredible,
and to be able to do it with my sister just makes it even more memorable,”
said Katie Reinprecht, the elder of the two by 21 months. “It’s
really been an indescribable experience.”
The first pair of sisters in U.S. field hockey history has already helped
Team USA claim gold at the 2011 Pan American Games. The Rein-prechts  will also play key roles in the team’s bid for an Olympic medal, which would  be the first since 1984.
But the international stage was not the first platform where the siblings competed together as the two have spent most of their careers following in the footsteps of eldest sister, Sarah Reinprecht. In 2009, Sarah Reinprecht graduated from Princeton University, capping her illustrious career as a four-time All-Ivy League selection. The younger siblings were sold.
“We knew we wanted to go to school together, and after seeing how much Sarah enjoyed Princeton and the great school it was, we couldn’t pass that up,” said Julia Reinprecht. “Sarah was always the
most level-headed of the three of us, and choosing Princeton was a good balance of academics and the athletics.”
While at Princeton, Katie Reinprecht was a two-time Ivy League Player of the Year and First Team All-American, while her sister earned the 2009 Ivy League Rookie of the Year and was twice named a Second
Team All-America selection.
It’s no coincidence that the sisters all chose field hockey as their specialty. Their mother, Tina Reinprecht, was their high school coach and founded a club field hockey program, Mystyx, for which they all played. After trying many different sports, the club helped them discover their mother’s passion for the game.
“I didn’t love field hockey when I first played,” Katie Reinprecht said. “I was more into soccer, so I pursued that path. But then when I started playing with Mystyx I started to realize how much I enjoyed the sport.
My mom never pushed it on us, but she definitely influenced it.”
When it was time to commit fully to playing at the national level, it was also a group decision. In preparation for the 2012 Games, they took a year off from college to train with Team USA in Chula Vista, Calif.
They worked out five days per week and took up sports psychology training. In the meantime, they traveled all over the world for competition, side by side.
Even though Katie Reinprecht was named to the team before her
sister, she felt they were together all along.  “I first was named on the team in 2009, but I didn’t feel that way until I moved out to train full-time,” Katie Reinprecht said. “That was actually
when Julia and a bunch of the other girls moved out, too. Technically I’ve been on the team longer, but it really feels like we both came into our own around the same time.”
Now in London, the entire family can celebrate the field hockey legacy they’ve built when the team takes the pitch for the second game of pool play tonight (July 31). For the sisters, the game will mark another
experience to their list of shared memories.
“Luckily, we both made the team, so we’ve been able to celebrate together and share the joy,” Julia Reinprecht said. “We’re kind of attached at the hip. It’s just been awesome to share this experience
with someone so close to you. It’s a rare, rare opportunity, so we’re totally grateful for each other.”

SYNCHRONIZED DIVING: BOUDIA, MCCRORY END MEDAL DROUGHT



BOUDIA, MCCRORY END MEDAL DROUGHT
BY KAREN ROSEN
David Boudia and Nick McCrory smiled and chatted during their Olympic diving competition
Monday (July 30), their lack of nerves perfectly in sync.
“We just joked back and forth,” said McCrory, 20, of Chapel Hill, N.C. “That’s always when
we dive our best.
“We do a fist bump before every dive, like ‘Let’s do it.’ That puts us both at ease and prepares
us mentally for doing a dive just like we would in practice without the added pressure
of, you know, 17,000 people watching.”
And that’s not to mention the millions of people around the world who saw the diving duo win
the bronze medal in men’s synchronized 10-meter platform, ending a 16-year-medal drought
for the U.S. men in the sport.
Kelci Bryant and Abby Johnston, who took silver in women’s synchronized 3-meter springboard
on Sunday, had already won the first U.S. diving medal since 2000.
Now it was the men’s turn for a breakthrough at the Aquatics Centre. In 10-meter synchronized
diving, they had to climb a tower as high as two London double-decker buses stacked end to end, dive off so their flips and twists mirrored each other, and try not to make too big of a splash.
“We’re so excited to be able to dive two days and get two medals out of it,” said Boudia, 23, of Noblesville, Ind., the reigning world silver medalist on platform. “There’s so much more in the tank. Nick and I
are now excited to be going individual (Aug. 9-10). We got everything out of the way, now we can go in there with the exact same mind frame – relaxed – and stay in control one dive at the time.”
In the 2008 Games, Boudia placed fifth in the same event with partner Thomas Finchum. This time, he and McCrory had a new perspective that involved “not being so wrapped up in getting this thing right
here,” Boudia said, holding up the medal around his neck, but simply in striving for their best performance.
The two divers, who became partners in early 2010, finished with 463.47 points. They trailed Mexican pair Ivan Garcia and German Sanchez, who had the highest difficulty in the six-dive competition,
by fewer than six points (468.90). China won its second gold of the Games in diving, with Cao Yuan and Zhang Yanquan scoring 486.78. Surprisingly, the Chinese did not lead with three dives down and three
to go. That honor belonged to crowd favorites Tom Daley and Peter Waterfield of Great Britain. But the Brits botched their fourth dive, a reverse 3½ somersault, and eventually wound up fourth (454.65).
But Boudia and McCrory also had a dive that could have been better,
their third, an inward 3½ somersault. They more than made up for it on their next dive, a forward 4½ somersault (92.13 points), surpassed only by their final dive, a back 2½ somersault with 2½ twists (95.04).
McCrory was determined not to repeat the 2011 world championships, when he and Boudia dropped out of medal contention because of a bad fifth dive.“It’s almost harder to continue hitting dives when another team opens the door, because then you see, ‘Wow, I can medal, I can do this,’” he said. “We had a silver medal in the palm of our hands and I lost sight of the dive that we were on. I was thinking about getting on the
podium. “I made my mistake and I wasn’t going to make it twice.”
Boudia said that when he and McCrory got out of the pool for the last time, they had no idea where they were placed. “We were back in the locker room, and if the Brits (who dove after the
Americans) hit it then they got third,” he said. “If they didn’t, we get third. I actually put on the blue shirt hoping to get the medal instead of the white shirt going home.”
He didn’t have to change, although he said he felt for the Brits and “their dreams getting crushed.”
“But it was a little triumph for Nick and I and a cool win for USA Diving,” Boudia added “The moment was incredible.”

The Gaslight Theater to Prduce Ken Ludwigs' "The Fox on the Fairway"‏

Hallowell, Maine - The Gaslight Theater to Produce Ken Ludwigs' "The Fox on the Fairway"
A tribute from Ken Ludwig (Lend Me A Tenor, Moon Over Buffalo) to the great English farces of the 1930s and 1940s, The Fox On the Fairway takes audiences on a hilarious romp which pulls the rug out from underneath the stuffy denizens of a private country club. It's a charmingly madcap adventure about love, life, and man's eternal love affair with… golf.

Bingham, president of a prestigious  Country Club, is in a difficult position, less by finding out that his newly hired hand, Justin, is in love with Louise, the waitress at the club house, but by the discovery that the golfer he thought would play for his club has switched sides. He's been recruited by his counterpart and opponent, the cocky and arrogant Dickie, and the huge bet he had foolishly wagered is now likely to be lost.

Fortunately, Bingham discovers that Justin is actually quite a good golfer and finagles his nomination. Justin does not disappoint and has a huge lead, when close to its end the tournament is interrupted by bad weather. Then the romance between Justin and Louise takes a turn for the worse, threatening the outcome of the match.

Bingham is desperate, and the appearance of his wife complicates the matter, as she catches him much too close to Pamela, his sex-starved vice-president.

Can Bingham win the wager, and get his life in order?

Filled with mistaken identities, slamming doors, and over-the-top romantic shenanigans, Fox on the Fairway is a furiously paced comedy that recalls the Marx Brothers' classics.

The cast is as follows:
Justin ~~~~  Henry Quintal
Louise ~~~~ Samantha Wilson
Bingham ~~~Jonathan Williams
Pamela ~~~~ Kathy Reardon
Dickie ~~~~ David Marshall
Muriel ~~~~ Elizabeth Kelso
·         August 30th, 31st and September 1st, 7:30 pm
·         September 7th and 8th, 7:30 pm
·         September 9, 2:00 pm matinee

Hallowell City Hall
 One Winthrop Street
Call 207-626-3698 for reservation-
Box office opens one hour before curtain

MALLOY WINS JUDO BRONZE


MALLOY WINS JUDO BRONZE
BY AUDREY SNYDER
Marti Malloy had 90 minutes to regroup, both physically and emotionally, to maintain her
Olympic dream of reaching the podium. The Oak Harbor, Wash., native had lost in the semifinals
on an ippon by Romania’s Corina Caprioriu with seven seconds left in the bout. She had
one more chance to fight her way to the bronze medal.
The first-time Olympian came back with a powerful throw to down Italy’s Giulia Quintavalle
and capture the bronze in the women’s judo 57 kg. class. Her medal is the second for an
American female and the 11th overall in U.S. Olympic judo history.
“After losing the semifinal, it’s the hardest thing in the world to come back,” Malloy said.
“You want to be mad and angry and upset, but my coach pulled me aside and said, ‘You
came here to win. You lost a close match and if you really want to win you’re going to totally
change your mindset and come back and focus on the bronze.’”
Malloy’s path to the podium was one of the toughest of the day as she opened with a match
against the No. 2 female in the world – Portugal’s flag bearer, Telma Monteiro.
“We were 0-3 against that girl but the matches have gotten closer and closer every time,”
U.S. Coach Jimmy Pedro said. “She was poised to beat her and getting into her head a little.
I let her know that Monteiro was going to feel a ton of pressure if we keep this match close.”
The first match went to overtime in eight minutes and took a lot of energy out of Malloy. However,
she rebounded with a quick second match and was able to stay composed as Pedro
stayed in her ear. A two-time Olympic bronze medalist, Pedro reminded Malloy about the
matches he lost in Atlanta and Athens and how the time spent between a loss and the next
bout makes a difference.
Malloy took a 20-minute rest after leaving the mat and then began stretching for her fifth
and final match of the day. The 26-year-old said her fitness level allowed her to feel prepared
throughout the grueling turnaround. When she felt Quintavalle beginning to falter, Malloy
relied on her film study of the Italian to quickly make a move.
“I’ve only trained with the Italian before and never fought her in competition,’ Malloy said.
“I’ve been a huge fan of hers ever since she won the Olympics in 2008. I study her judo and
really look up to her. Knowing that was an advantage for me because I know what she does.”
Malloy is unsure whether she will compete at the 2016 Games in Rio. She said she’s satisfied
with her bronze from this competition and wants to shift her focus to becoming a world
champion.
“The shock of it still gives me goosebumps,” Malloy said. She quickly added that she may
leave her job as a receptionist and enter another field of work. The thought of answering the
phone and saying, “Bronze medalist speaking,” left Malloy in stitches.
As for falling short of a chance at the gold medal, Malloy says she will not look back and
wonder what could have been had she held on for seven more seconds in the semifinals.
“I feel like I fought my behind off in that match and I think I fought well and did everything
right,” Malloy said. “What’s done is done.”
In between Malloy’s bouts, Nick Delpopolo (Westfield, N.J.) came up one win short of the
semifinals in the men’s 73 kg. class in the men’s competition. His bout with Wang Ki-Chum
was scoreless, but the judges awarded the victory to Ki.
“I didn’t do enough offense,” said Delpopolo, who finished seventh. “I had favorable grips
and I just didn’t use it enough. You wish you could get it back but it’s a good lesson learned.”

KVCC Foundation awarded childcare, tuition-waiver, and equipment grants

Fairfield, Maine - The Kennebec Valley Community College (KVCC) Foundation has been awarded three grants that will directly benefit programs and students at the College.

The grants include:

$20,000 from the Davis Family Foundation to support students whose children are attending Educare Central Maine in Waterville. The money will be used to subsidize childcare expenses for approximately 20 low-income students.

$5,000 from the Plum Creek Foundation to purchase equipment for KVCC's new Energy Services and Technology Program, a two-year associate degree program which will begin classes in the fall of 2012.

$3,000 from the Oak Grove School Foundation to support dual enrolled high school students. The money will be used to fund College fees and textbook expenses for approximately 30 low-income students who are enrolled in classes at KVCC.

The KVCC Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing area citizens with an accessible and affordable quality education. "Each of these grant awards will ensure that students are able to access and persist in reaching their professional and educational goals," said Michelle Webb, Executive Director of the KVCC Foundation.

"The Foundation is grateful for these grants and proud to have played a role in earning them from these prestigious organizations", said Jack Sutton, KVCC Foundation Chair.

To learn more about any of these grants contact Michelle Webb at mwebb@kvcc.me.edu or call (207)453-5020.

To learn more about the Energy Services and Technology program at KVCC go to http://www.kvcc.me.edu/Pages/Energy-Services-Technology/Energy-Services-Technology-Home.

The Davis Family Foundation is a public charitable foundation established by Phyllis C. Davis and H. Halsey Davis of Falmouth, Maine, to support educational, medical and cultural/arts organizations located primarily in Maine. The Foundation was established following Mr. Davis's retirement as President and Chairman of Shaw's Supermarkets, Inc.

The Plum Creek Foundation supports organizations that improve the quality of life in the communities where Plum Creek operates and where its employees live and work. Grants are awarded to non-profit organizations throughout Plum Creek's operating area.

The Oak Grove School Foundation supports the educational and cultural needs of secondary students and non-profit organizations in the greater Central Maine area.

Kennebec Valley Community College is one of seven community colleges in Maine. KVCC prepares full-time and part-time students to enter the job market, to transfer to colleges and universities, and to achieve their professional and personal goals. Programs and services support the economic growth of the community in response to changing needs.

In 2011 and again in 2012, KVCC was named one of the top community colleges in the nation by the Aspen Institute, placing in the top 10 percent of two-year colleges based on student success rates.

To learn more about KVCC, go to www.kvcc.me.edu

FRANKLIN EARNS FIRST OLYMPIC MEDAL



Missy Franklin and Matt Grevers earned a spot atop the podium Monday (July 31), re-writing
the record books while claiming gold in the women’s and men’s 100-meter backstroke
events. Franklin’s time of 58.33 was an American record, while Grevers’ touched the wall in
an Olympic record-time of 52.16.
Overall, the U.S. swam away with four medals on the third night of competition at the Aquatic
Centre, with Nick Thoman and Rebecca Soni picking up silvers in the men’s 100 backstroke
and the women’s 100 breaststroke.
So far, the U.S. has collected 12 medals in London, marking a total of 500 Olympic medals
in the pool since the advent of the modern Olympic Games in 1896. The next closest team,
Australia, has accumulated a total of 153 medals. Franklin’s gold medal-winning performance
helped the U.S. realize that legacy on Monday.
“I’ve dreamed about this moment my whole life,” Franklin said. “I can’t believe it just happened.
I just can’t put it into words. It’s absolutely indescribable. After imagining it happening
for so long, it’s unbelievable.”
Franklin’s time bettered the previous American record of 58.95, which she set at last month’s
U.S. Olympic Team Trials. Monday’s swim also marked the third straight time an American
woman has won the 100 backstroke at the Olympic Games. Teammate Natalie Coughlin
won the event in 2004 and 2008.
Franklin’s win came on the heels of a tough double. She also swam in the semifinals of the
women’s 200 freestyle – just 13 minutes before the start of the 100 backstroke – qualifying
eighth for tonight’s finals.
“I love doing back-to-back doubles like that,” Franklin said. “It’s fun. I don’t have time to get
nervous.”
In the men’s 100 backstroke, Grevers was in control the whole way, overcoming a five-hundredth-
of-a-second deficit to France’s Camille LaCourt at the turn and powering his 6 foot,
7 inch frame home for the win. His teammate Thoman was sixth at the wall and crept up on
the field for the silver in 52.92.
“I kind of saved my legs on the first 50 to make sure I had a good dolphin kick off that wall,”
Grevers said. “I don’t think it’s hit me yet. I feel great right now and just want to share it withmy whole family.”
This marks the second straight Games that Americans have gone 1-2 in the men’s 100 backstroke.
Grevers won silver in the event at the 2008 Games behind teammate Aaron Peirsol,
who set the former Olympic record at 52.54.
“I thought it was really cool,” Thoman said. “The first thing I wanted to do was give him a big
hug, so I jumped over the lane rope and gave him one.”
Soni swam her typical race in the women’s 100 breaststroke. Touching sixth at the wall, she
separated herself from most of the field and closed the gap on leader Ruta Meilutyte in the
final 50 meters. In the end, she ran out of room, and Meilutyte out-touched Soni for the gold
by eight-hundredths of a second, 1:05.47 to 1:05.55. Fellow USA teammate Breeja Larson
placed sixth in 1:06.96.
Soni also won silver in the event at the 2008 Games. Monday marked the first time since
then that she lost the race at a major international competition. Still, her performance was her
fastest time this year.
“I thought I was in good enough position to win,” Soni said. “I was close but no cigar. I can’t
say I was completely satisfied because it was so close, and I gave it my all. I’m just happy to
get on the podium for Team USA.”
Heading into the Games, the men’s 200 freestyle was billed as one of the most competitive
fields of the meet. It lived up to the hype.
France’s Yannick Agnel, the hero of last night’s men’s 4x100 freestyle, jumped out to an early
lead, leaving the rest of the pack to jockey for position through the last 50 meters. Lochte
was in second for a time, but the rest of the field moved up on him coming down the homestretch.
Agnel took gold in 1:43.14, while Lochte finished fourth in 1:45.04, marking the first
swimming final where the U.S. walked away without a medal in these Games.
Americans swimming in semifinals Monday included Allison Schmitt in the women’s 200
freestyle (2nd, 1:56.15); Missy Franklin in the women’s 200m freestyle (8th, 1:57.57); Michael
Phelps in the men’s 200 butterfly (4th, 1:54.53); Tyler Clary in the men’s 200 butterfly (5th,
1:54.93); Caitlin Leverenz in the women’s 200 IM (3rd, 2:10.06) and Ariana Kukors in the
women’s 200 IM (4th, 2:10.08). The top-eight swimmers in each event will compete in tomorrow
night’s finals.

Monday, July 30, 2012

Switched at Birth Returns September 3rd


ABC Family's award-winning hit drama series, "Switched at Birth," will return with all new episodes beginning Monday, September 3 at 8:00PM ET/PT. In advance of the premiere, Hyperion will release a Switched at Birth book (available at online retailers on August 28) divulging the contents of a memoir authored by the character Kathryn Kennish (played by Lea Thompson) in the series.

In addition, the network will air a special "Switched at Birth" marathon (13 episodes) on Monday, September 3, from 7:00AM - 8:00PM ET/PT, leading up to the season 1C premiere. "Switched at Birth" is a family drama that explores blended families and deaf culture, with an array of deaf and hard-of-hearing actors, and includes scenes shot entirely in American Sign Language. "Switched at Birth" launched as the network's #1 series debut of all time in Total Viewers, Adults 18-34, Women 18-34, Adults 18-49 and Women 18-49, and overall, ranked as the #1 new cable series of Summer 2011 across its core female demos.

The Switched at Birth book by Kathryn Kennish (played by Lea Thompson) is the inside story of the "Switched at Birth" family as only a mother could tell it. In her memoir, Kathryn reveals the surprising and intimate layers of her story-from the private details of the switched-at-birth revelation to all that occurs in its aftermath, including Regina and Daphne's move into the Kennish household. In the wake of this immense shift, secrets and previously unexamined issues from Kathryn's and her family's past surface as they are forced to reexamine everything they assumed about what makes a family a family. The book, like the show, touches on themes that any family who has ever felt different or "not normal" will recognize and appreciate.

Currently nominated for an Imagen Award and a Television Critics Association Award, "Switched at Birth" has been honored with AFTRA's (American Federation of Television and Radio Artists) American Scene "Crystal" Award(r)", the Producers Guild of America George Sunga Award and a Gracie Award.

"Switched at Birth" is executive-produced by Lizzy Weiss ("Blue Crush"), Paul Stupin ("Make It or Break It"), Becky Hartman Edwards ("Parenthood") and John Ziffren ("Melissa & Joey," "Make It or Break It"). The series also stars Katie Leclerc as Daphne Vasquez; Vanessa Marano ("Gilmore Girls") as Bay Kennish; Constance Marie ("George Lopez") as Regina Vasquez; D.W. Moffett ("Friday Night Lights") as John Kennish; Lea Thompson ("Back to the Future," "Caroline in the City") as Kathryn Kennish; Lucas Grabeel ("High School Musical") as Toby Kennish; and Sean Berdy as Emmett Bledsoe, along with guest stars Gilles Marini ("Dancing with the Stars") and Marlee Matlin ("The West Wing").

Photographs in this article are courtesy of ABC Family.

U.S. men finish fifth at the 2012 Olympic Games

London, England - The United States men's team finished fifth with a score of 269.952 at the 2012 Olympic Games at the North Greenwich Arena. China earned gold with a 275.997, Japan took silver with a 271.952 and the Great Britain earned bronze with a 271.711. The Ukraine was fourth with a 271.526.

The U.S. Men's Team includes Jake Dalton of Reno, Nev./University of Oklahoma; Jonathan Horton of Houston/Team Hilton HHonors (Cypress Academy); Danell Leyva of Miami/Team Hilton HHonors (Universal Gymnastics); Sam Mikulak of Newport Coast, Calif./University of Michigan; and John Orozco of the Bronx, N.Y./Team Hilton HHonors (U.S. Olympic Training Center).

Men's Olympic Team coach Kevin Mazeika said, "We saw what they were capable of in the team prelims, but team finals is a new competition and that's why we have the competition. The guys fought really hard from start to finish."

The USA men started off on floor exercise. Leyva led off with his layout double-twisting double-back mount and a double layout dismount to score 15.200. Mikulak mounted with a double-twisting double tuck and dismounted with a triple full but put his hands down to score a 14.600. Dalton anchored the team on this event with his routine that included an Arabian double layout mount and a triple twist dismount, which scored a 15.466.

On pommel horse, Leyva scored a 13.400 due to a problem in the middle of his routine. Mikulak hit a nice routine, which included a single pommel Russian Tong Fei and triple Russian, to score a 14.500. Orozco had some trouble with his pommel horse routine and scored a 12.733.

Dalton was the lead gymnast on still rings showing a pike and tuck Yamawaki and double twisting, double back dismount, which scored a 15.033. Horton added a 15.266 to the team total with his routine, which included an Azarian Maltese and a back uprise Maltese, bounce cross. He dismounted with a tucked double twisting, double back. Orozco finished on the event, showing an Azarian L cross and a tuck Yamawaki, back uprise straddle planche and dismounting with a one-and-a-half twisting double back for a 14.958.

On vault, Orozco sat down on his front handspring double full twist and scored a 14.600.

Mikulak and Dalton, both with a 7.0 start value vaults, showed an impressive Kasamatsu double twist (which is actually three twists), scoring a 15.966 and 16.066, respectively.

Mikulak's parallel bars routine included a front uprise Suarez, Tippelt and a double pike dismount to score a 15.266. Orozco's routine was solid with a front one-and-a-quarter and a stuck double pike dismount, which scored a 15.133. 2011 parallel bars World Champion Leyva performed with ease, showing a peach Diamodov, a giant Diamodov half and a double pike dismount to score a 15.366.

On the last event, horizontal bar, the USA men hit three for three routines. Orozco led off with his Liukin, layout Tkatchev and full twisting double layout dismount. Orozco scored a 15.333. 2008 Olympic high bar silver medalist Horton performed a Zou Li Min, a Cassina, a layout Kovacs and dismounted with a full twisting double layout to score a 15.200. Leyva performed his usual breathtaking routine, which included a Liukin, layout Kovacs, layout Tkatchev and a layout double twisting double back, which scored a 15.866.

Horton said, "I'm just really proud of the guys. We struggled, but we continued to show what this team is about. We have this never stop fighting attitude and that's exactly what we did. We never stopped fighting in this competition. Deep down in my heart I believe we are a great team."

Leyva and Orozco compete in the all-around final Aug. 1, and individual event finals are Aug. 5-7. Team USA individual event finalists are: Dalton, floor exercise; Mikulak, vault; Horton, horizontal bar; and Leyva, horizontal bar.

The women's team final is July 31 at 4:30 p.m. BST/11:30 a.m. EST.

Ways to follow the Olympic Games include:

USAGym.org, the USA Gymnastics official website, is a great source for information about the sport: latest news, the schedule of its premier events, athlete biographies, videos, photo galleries, live scoring from major events and more. USA Gymnastics also has usagymclub.org, which is a resource center for parents of potential and existing gymnasts.

TeamUSA.org, the U.S. Olympic Committee's website will also be a good resource for information on the Team USA in London.

Facebook - USA Gymnastics has an official Facebook page, www.facebook.com/USAGymnastics, which carries USA Gymnastics information and activities for fans. The USOC's official Facebook page is www.facebook.com/USOlympicTeam

Twitter - USA Gymnastics has an official Twitter feed -- @usagym. The USOC's Twitter feed is @usolympic.

NBCOlympics.com - NBC is the broadcast and web source for coverage and news on the Olympic Games. NBCOlympics.com will carry live coverage of every gymnastics session as well as all sports, and maintain an archive for on-demand coverage. A special "Live Extra" app for smartphones and tablets is available as well.

For gymnastics, viewing options will include a single "integrated" feed showing various competitors (akin to watching on TV), plus separate feeds for each apparatus.
Check your local listings for dates and times in your area here: http://www.nbcolympics.com/tv-listings/index.html.

YouTube - USA Gymnastics has an official YouTube Channel, www.youtube.com/usagymnasticsorg, which features routines of the top gymnasts from various events, interviews, etc. The USOC's YouTube Channel is www.youtube.com/TeamUSA.